Sticks, stones, and the power of Words

Pseudoscience is one of my favorite genre of topics to debate with myself. 

That's right. This (see both videos below) is the kind of stuff that actually has kept me awake at night.

 

The previous video was the first one I came across of Dr. Emoto's work. I have watched the previous video over and over again because of how intriguing it is. And that video led me to find this one on youtube...


The basic idea of Masaru Emoto's is this: 

Words matter because they have meaning. The sounds of words (whether spoken or not) give off vibrations. Words (whether tangible or not) have the actual power to create and/or destroy and so, everyone ought to be very careful to use that power very specifically to do exactly as they intend - whether negative or positive.
Something important to note about the previous videos (and many others you might find on the web), is that it's impossible to prove (and verify) the true validity of the results.
  • Does this mean that what is shown in the videos is entirely untrue? (No.) 
  • Does this mean that there are enough unanswered questions that exist because of the videos in order to question the results that they insist are true? (Yes. Indeed.)
The metaphorical message of both videos is something important and should be considered true and that is that words do matter because of the meaning they convey and apply depending upon how/when they are used.

I agree that words have real power to create and destroy and they should be used thoughtfully no matter if they are spoken, written, or even if they exist only in thought.

I also think both videos do a great job at showing and trying to make an abstract understanding a lot more physical/tangible and, thus, more easy to understand and grasp.

But whether you believe them to be pseudoscience or actual science, perhaps there can be agreement of this:

Words are powerful and using that power should always be done with intention and care. 


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